Bollywood superstar Salman Khan has walked out of the Jodhpur Central Jail, where he spent the last two nights after being convicted for killing two blackbucks 20 years ago. Judge Ravindra Kumar Joshi, who began hearing his bail request this morning, has ordered his release on bail.

The actor will now directly head to the airport, from where he will take a chartered flight, back home to Mumbai.

In court today, Salman Khan’s lawyers were asked to file a bail bond for Rs. 50,000 and produce a Rs. 25,000 surety from two persons each to guarantee that the actor will comply with all bail conditions. The bail documents were be sent to Jodhpur Central Jail around 5 pm and he was released in the next 30 minutes. But he can’t leave the country without the court’s permission.

The 52-year-old actor was sentenced to five years for killing two blackbucks 20 years ago in Kankani village, near Jodhpur in Rajasthan, during the shooting of a multi-starrer, “Hum Saath Saath Hain”.

His co-actors Saif Ali Khan, Tabu, Neelam Kothari and Sonal Bendre, who were in the SUV that the Dabangg star was driving during their alleged late night hunting outing, were, however, acquitted by the Jodhpur sessions court.

In the hearing today, the prosecution talked about the credibility of the witnesses and hinged the case on the post-mortem report which said that the blackbucks had gunshot wounds. However, Salman’s lawyers argued that only the bones of the animals were sent for evaluation when their skins, as crucial, weren’t. They asked for bail on grounds that the witnesses against him weren’t reliable.

Judge Joshi, who is in the middle of the annual reshuffle of judges in Rajasthan, had, on Friday, put off the hearing by a day as he wanted to go through the entire case record before making a decision. He will be replaced by Chandra Kumar Songara, district and sessions judge of Bhilwara within the next week.

On Thursday, Judge Dev Kumar Khatri had convicted Salman Khan for poaching two endangered blackbucks in 1998. The case against him was brought by members of the Bishnoi community, who revere antelopes. The community has pursued the case for almost two decades and welcomed his conviction.

In the numerous hearings over the years, the actor and his counsels insisted that he was being framed. Reports that the animals died of “overeating” or that they were killed by dogs were also submitted in court to establish his innocence.