PadMan box office collection day 4: Akshay Kumar starer that released with a bang on Friday collecting a total of Rs 10.26 crore on its opening day has grossed up the figures to a total of Rs 40.05 crore by day 3.

R Balki’s social drama PadMan shows no signs of slowing down at the box office. The Akshay Kumar, Radhika Apte and Sonam Kapoor starrer continues to mint money rapidly in its very first week. The film which deals with the menstrual hygiene is inspired by the real-life ‘PadMan’ Arunachalam Muruganantham who brought a revolution with his idea of making cheap and accessible sanitary napkins.

The film released with a bang on Friday collecting a total of Rs 10.26 crore on its opening day, Rs 13.68 crore on Saturday and Rs 16.11 crore on Sunday. Grossing up the figures to a total of Rs 40.05 crore within the first three days already, Akshay Kumar’s film is eyeing big numbers. After impressing the audience with Toilet: Ek Prem Katha which was also based on a social issue, PadMan seems to set yet another example of being a successful socially relevant film.

Bollywood celebs too are all praise for the film. Ayushmann Khurrana took to Twitter and wrote, “#Padman is a very important film for us. @akshaykumar is one of the most special actors we have. @radhika_apte is earthy. @sonamakapoor is spunky. Kudos @mrsfunnybones! Watch it and get inspired.”

Yami Gautam also wrote, “Incredibly courageous !!! Totally bowled over #PadMan .. this enduring story will touch your hearts & will you inspired ! Respect & kudos to the entire team 👏🏻😇 @akshaykumar @kriarj @mrsfunnybones #RBalki @radhika_apte @sonamakapoor & #ArunachalamMuruganantham 🙏🏻”

The Indian Express film critic Shubhra Gupta in her review of PadMan said, “Akshay Kumar is now consistently green-lighting socially-relevant films, and that is fine and laudable (Pad Man is produced by his wife Twinkle Khanna, a witty commentator on social mores). PadMan is as worthy, but it isn’t a particularly good film. It has tonal problems, swinging between commonplace-ness and flat-out filmi-ness, because it is trying to appeal to many constituencies at the same time: a song to celebrate the onset of menstruation of a little girl uses the problematic word ‘nakel’, which means ‘to be led by the nose’.”