A year after these once-greats staged their return, we’re still waiting to be impressed.

Last February, the once-great Nokia and BlackBerry brands each hoped to stage a triumphant return at the world’s largest phone show.

A year on, we’re still waiting for a knockout device that will put either one back in the international spotlight in a meaningful way. Despite the brands launching eight Android phones between them in the past year, it’s clear neither one has turned the tide.

Neither company can expect to return to their pre-2010 heights, before the phone world accelerated its path to its current iPhone-Android duopoly. But if their respective comebacks fall flat, it means fewer choices for consumers in an era increasingly dominated by Apple and Samsung handsets.

Fewer than 6 million Nokia phones shipped in the past year, IHS Markit analyst Wayne Lam told CNET, adding that his firm deems 10 million shipments as significant. BlackBerry Mobile could have shipped as many as 170,000 units in the fourth quarter, according to Neil Shah, an analyst at Counterpoint Research. In contrast, Apple sold 77.3 million iPhones in a single quarter.

BlackBerry Mobile (as opposed to BlackBerry Limited, which doesn’t manage the phone arm) declined to share sales figures and HMD Global, which licenses Nokia’s name, didn’t respond to multiple requests to comment on this story.

Low sales figures are to be expected for these revivalists, even a year in. Comebacks in the phone world don’t happen overnight; they occur over years of steady investment and marketing work.

“[With] Nokia and BlackBerry, there’s an expectation that they will take the world by storm in just a few months and dominate the market once again,” said Francois Mahieu, BlackBerry Mobile’s chief commercial officer. “The world knows there are two mega players right now, Apple and Samsung … it takes time.”

Both BlackBerry and Nokia phones are expected to update in the coming months, hoping to kick up momentum once again. The Nokia brand has its announcement this week at Mobile World Congress 2018 and BlackBerry is expected to unveil its next phone later in March, according to analysts.

The hopefuls will need much more than a flashy presentation or booth space to wrest attention from the Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus, which Samsung will unveil on February 25. For BlackBerry and Nokia devices to stand a chance against the Samsung leviathan, they’ll need to show top-tier phones with hardware and software good enough to compete.

A year ago, it looked like Nokia phones would fulfill their fans’ biggest wish: to run on Android software. But even six releases in, the handsets aren’t doing much other than laying a stable budget base. After years of smartphone hot potato, they have a lot of catching up to do.

The original Nokia phones first switched hands to Microsoft, which bought the rights in 2013, and replaced Nokia’s proprietary software (primarily Symbian with a dash of MeeGo) with Windows OS. Three years later, Microsoft bumped its license to a new company, HMD Global, which uses Android.

With so many Android phones available, Nokia phones today rely on hardware and competitive pricing to stand out. However, HMD Global’s 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and higher-end Nokia 8, failed to generate as much buzz as the 3310, a revamped feature phone that doesn’t even have Wi-Fi, apps or a touchscreen.